GAMEREADY Case Study

With GAMEREADY, Stanford students can discover athletics events, claim group tickets and manage their athletics rewards.

 
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Project Summary

Problem Domain: Athletics Events and Student Ticketing

​Finding what athletics events are happening, or even knowing if you can go to them is a massive problem for Stanford University students. Add to it a confusing student ticketing process, and you have low turnout to your athletics competitions. GAMEREADY provides a quick and easy-to-use platform for students to discover events they can attend, and claim their tickets (with friends!) right on their phones.

Timeline: 3 months, Jan. 2020 - Mar. 2020

Role & Team: UX Designer, Team of 4

Tools: Figma

Methodologies: paper prototypes, digital prototypes, ideation sessions, user interviews, usability testing, comparator studies, pattern modification, mood boards, style guides, journey mapping, grounded theory, RITE testing, Nits vs Needs tables, molecule creation

Final Product: hi-fi Figma iOS mobile prototype

 

Design Process

Before our team started specifically on GAMEREADY, we conducted a project beforehand on the larger Stanford Athletics and Athletics ticketing service. All this work was preparatory to our success with GAMEREADY. Full documentation of this previous project is linked below.

For GAMEREADY, our team utilized these design tools and methodologies to arrive to our final design:

  • ​Molecule creation

  • Service blueprint

  • Comparator studies

  • Nits - > Needs Table, 'How Might We's

  • Ideation and concept sketches

  • Paper and digital prototypes iterations

  • RITE test plans and results

  • Ethical considerations

  • Mood boards, style tiles

  • Final design prototype

 

Molecule Creation

We met Sarah, a Stanford undergraduate student. She is trying to find tickets to the next home football game. She is currently searching through the Stanford Athletics ticketing website.


When she was on the website, she got confused by all of the different ticketing options. Her inability to find a ticket left her discouraged and no longer wanting to go to the game at all.


With the new chatbot, Sarah was able to get the necessary game information and all of her remaining questions answered. On top of that she was able to find out about gametime rewards, food specials, and student interest for that particular game. She was also able to connect with her friends and ensure they all had tickets for the game. Finally, she received her ticket via a message from the chatbot and is able to easily scan it at the gate and enjoy the game.

 
molecule_edited.jpg
 

Service Blueprint

After getting a sense of what our problem space was in Sarah's ticket journey, we mapped out the journey of getting a student ticket with our service of supplying easy student tickets.

At this moment our team decided that an app would be a better direction to into because we were inspired by the success of Disneyland's group ticketing experience. We felt that an app would provide a central location for both group tickets and event information. By providing this value to students, we felt that it would outweigh the obstacle of downloading and setting up another app on their phones.

After mapping out our entire ticketing service blueprint, we selected a focus area that we felt our app would be able to support most effectively. We also felt that our focus area would be the most interesting for our team to design in as students.

 

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Ticketing service blueprint
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Service design focus area
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Ticketing service blueprint
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Service design focus area
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Comparator Studies

After narrowing our focus to the ticket delivery area of our blueprint, we looked at industry comparators that we could learn from. We created comparator studies to better investigate the ticketing space.

The comparators we chose to look at were: Facebook Events, Eventbrite and Forever 21's online fashion chat bot. We chose the Facebook and Eventbrite comparators to further understand event discovery and event ticketing practices. We chose the Forever 21 chat bot to understand the possibility of the chat bot, as well as how the chat bot give suggestions to the user.

Questions we wanted answered from each comparator study:

Comparator 1: Forever21 Website Chatbot

Question we’re trying to answer: “How does this existing chatbot cater to specific questions?

Comparator 2: Facebook Events

Question we’re trying to answer: “When scheduling events, what pieces of information are most important to students, and how do they search for those pieces of information?

Comparator 3: Eventbrite Mobile Ticketing

Question we’re trying to answer: “How do customers react to mobile ticket delivery?

 

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Stickies from comparator studies, organized by common themes/insights
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Stickies from comparator studies, organized by common themes/insights
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Stickies from comparator studies, organized by common themes/insights
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Stickies from comparator studies, organized by common themes/insights
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Comparator study notes
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Comparator study notes
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Comparator study notes
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Stickies from comparator studies, organized by common themes/insights
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Stickies from comparator studies, organized by common themes/insights
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Stickies from comparator studies, organized by common themes/insights
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Stickies from comparator studies, organized by common themes/insights
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Comparator study notes
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Comparator study notes
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Comparator study notes
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Nits vs. Needs

After conducting our comparator studies with 4 participants, we came up with a list of minor (nits) and major themes/issues (needs) that arose through our synthesis.

Nits vs. Needs from Comparators Study:

Forever 21 Chatbot, Eventbrite Mobile Ticketing, Facebook Events


Nits:

  • Clear and consistent formatting for fonts

  • Confirmation of payment + if ticket to your wallet

  • Stating whether the chatbot is an actual person or not

  • Relevant cover photos

  • Clear categories


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Needs:

  • To trust the process/app

    • If using a chatbot, need to trust the chatbot

    • Know what it is; if it’s a person say it’s a person

  • Be able to connect with friends in some way

  • Easily access the ticket after purchase

    • Look at + improve the Apple Wallet interaction

  • Support both last-minute decisions, as well as long term event planning

  • Suggestions people ‘don’t hate’

  • *Good initial read of an event

  • *Categorizing by price, date, city, food/drink availability, etc.

  • *Need to be convinced to go, ‘needs to come to me’

    • Convince you + your friends to go

    • How many of your      friends have already decided to go

  • Need to see value in the event

  • Some way to be reminded of it

  • Incorporated into their daily life, into their schedule at-large


Brainstorm Ideas:

  • Need to be convinced to go, ‘needs to come to me’

  • Good initial read of an event + categorizing by price, date, city, food/drink availability, etc.

Solution Ideas:

  • Linking tickets together - any group member can have all the tickets for the group

  • Voting for rewards at the event - rewards get more tailored as you go

  • Meetup Map to set gameday logistics

 

Ideation and Concept Sketches

 
Crazy 8 ideation sketches
Crazy 8 ideation sketches
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Crazy 8 ideation sketches
Crazy 8 ideation sketches
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Crazy 8 ideation sketches
Crazy 8 ideation sketches
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Paper and Digital Prototype Iterations

 
Event discovery and details page paper prototype
Group ticketing paper prototype
 
Event discovery and details page digital prototype
Group ticketing digital prototype part 1
Group ticketing digital prototype part 2
 

RITE Testing and Insights

RITE Test 1:

Tester: Marilyn F. (Stanford Student, Junior)

Question: How do users utilize the Events home page of our app? What are the most important categories to them (Stanford students)?


Feedback:

  • I like the based on your interest, fit your schedule, new > like that it fits to you

  • events that fit ur schedule is nice to plan ahead

  • If other friends say that they wanna go that day, I go

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RITE Test 2:

Tester: Jack C. (Stanford Student, Freshman)

Question: How do students react to the fact that they can get group tickets for athletics events? How does this affect their athletics social experience?

Feedback:

  • “Even though I already know what Stanford soccer looks like, it gives me a visual”

  • Email’s cluttered, nice in how it's laid out

  • Looking at the claim button, I am more inclined to claim a ticket


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RITE Test 3:

Tester: Jaden R. (Stanford Student, Sophomore + Stanford Football Graphic Design Intern)

Question: How does a Stanford Athletics marketing intern see GAMEREADY’s visual design fitting into the Stanford Athletics branding scheme?

Feedback:

  • Claim tickets button good > process for football tickets to long: need login to website, claim ticket, then load to phone. Website not optimized for mobile experience.

  • A lot more accessible, very helpful to add to Apple wallet > what if I don’t have service, and can’t get my ticket > apple wallet you don’t need service

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RITE Test 4:

Tester: Laura F. (Stanford Student, Senior)

Question: General test of all features

Feedback:

  • Tries to manage groups within profile

  • Would compare with own calendar by herself

  • The idea group tickets can slide is not clear

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RITE Test 5:

Tester: Natalie F. (Stanford student, Athlete)

Question: What factors are important to you when deciding whether or not to attend an event?

Feedback:

  • Wants to check the names for the group

  • Based on interest is important

  • Schedule could change based on priorities


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RITE Test 6:

Tester: Audrey N. (Stanford Student, Freshman, Athlete)

Question: General test of all features

Feedback:

  • The group tickets were easy to find

  • Rewards don’t really matter in determining event choice

  • Rewards points were easy to find

 

Mood Boards and 

Style Tiles

 

Mood boards and draft style tiles:

Alema mood board 1
Alema mood board 2
Alema draft style tile
Lily mood board 1
Lily mood board 2
Lily draft style tile
 

Final style tile:

Frame 1.png
 

Final Design and Prototype:

Below is our final prototype built in Figma, as well as our final prototype screens and task flows.

 

'Events' tab screens:

events final proto.png
 

'My Tickets' tab screens:

ticketing final proto.png
 

'My Profile' tab screens:

profile final proto.png
 

'Get Individual Ticket' task flow screens:

claim tix final proto 1.png
 

'Get Group Tickets' task flow screens:

claim tix final proto 2.png
 

Ethical Considerations

When designing GAMEREADY, one ethical consideration we had was how we would prioritize sports. In designing our home screen, we tried to emphasize the discovery of different sports, outside of the commonly attended football, basketball and baseball games. 


We included a ‘Try Something New’ category to encourage students to attend sports events that they have not attended before. Additionally, we utilized the full screen images of the athletes playing their sport to encourage student’s curiosity in discovering what lesser known sports look like.